• Eartha Armstrong, L.Ac.

It’s perfect soup weather!

It feels like winter outside, here in Longmont, Colorado. The ground is covered in a blanket of white snow, the air is cold and crisp and it’s perfect soup weather!

I just got a beautiful butternut squash from the farm and thought I’d share a warming butternut squash soup recipe with you all. If you have the time you can make bone broth or vegetable broth as the base, or if not you can use a chicken, veggie or bone broth from the store.


Bone Broth Recipe

3-4 pounds organic beef marrow (or knuckle bones)

2 pounds organic meaty bones

1/2 cup raw apple cider vinegar

4 quarts filtered water

3 celery stalks, halved

3 carrots, halved

3 onions, quartered

2 cloves garlic- skin left on

Handful of fresh parsley

Pinch of whole peppercorns

Sea salt


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Start by roasting the bones at 450*F for 30 minutes in a roasting pan, then flip and roast for another 15 minutes.

Remove bones and place into stock pot or slow cooker (scraping all the bits from the pan), add water (you can add more to cover bones) and vinegar and then let them soak for up to an hour (this leaches minerals from the bones).

Add veggies and bring to a boil, skim the scum off the top and discard.

Lower to a simmer and cook 24-72 hours (or 4-8 in an Instant-pot or pressure cooker).

During the last 10 minutes of cooking add the handful of parsley for extra flavor and minerals.

Add salt to taste.

The broth should be used immediately, stored 5-7 days in the fridge or frozen in the freezer for up to 6 months. I use glass quart jars if I'm going to use the broth up right away, or if I decide to freeze it, I often use yogurt containers because they are quart size and expand as the broth freezes (be sure to cool the broth completely before transferring to plastic containers. Alternately, friends have used ice cube trays then put in a heavy freezer bag for easy measuring.


If you're a vegetarian, you can make a delicious homemade vegetable stock:


Vegetable Stock Recipe

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 medium onions, unpeeled, cut into 1-inch pieces

10 celery stalks, cut into 1-inch pieces

2 large carrots, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces

8 ounces cremini or button mushrooms, halved if large

2 small potatoes

1 head of garlic, halved crosswise

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns




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Heat the oil in a large stock pot on medium heat, add all ingredients, and cook for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add 4 quarts water and bring to a boil.

Lower to a simmer and cook 1-2 hours

Strain through a sieve, add salt to taste


Stock can be used immediately, stored 5-7 days in the fridge or frozen in the freezer for up to 6 months.



Butternut Squash Soup Recipe

2 Tbl butter

1 medium onion, chopped

1 large carrot, chopped

1 Tbl fresh ginger

1 clove garlic (opt)

1 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed

2 C. Stock (bone, veggie or store bought)

Salt/pepper to taste

Optional: nutmeg, sour cream or oven roasted squash seeds to garnish


>>>>—<<<<

Sauté onion, garlic and ginger in the butter in a large soup pot until fragrant and translucent.

Add squash and carrots and stir for a few minutes until golden on the edges.

Add stock and bring to a boil.

Turn down to a simmer, cover and cook until tender 30-40 minutes.

Pour into a blender and blend until smooth.

Garnish with nutmeg, sour cream or oven roasted squash seeds and enjoy!



According to the American Botanical Council

“In Traditional Chinese Medicine squash is a warming food that aids digestion, improves qi (energy) deficiency in the spleen/pancreas, and alleviates pain. Application of fresh squash juice may reduce inflammation and relieve burns, and its slightly acidic nature led to its incorporation as an ingredient in bone marrow or “longevity” soup.”


The seeds can be gently toasted with a dash of salt or tamari (soy sauce) for a delicious snack that has been used for centuries as an anti-parasitic.


Onions, ginger and garlic are warming to the body and help clear phlegm.

Ginger and black pepper are wonderful digestives and good at settling the belly.

Garlic strengthens the Yang (warmth and energy) of the body and opens the chest.

And nutmeg warms the belly, helps to balance the digestive energy and stops pain.


May you have deep health this fall!






References

Baumana, Hannah, and Sarah Edwards. “Food as Medicine: Butternut Squash (Cucurbita Moschata, Cucurbitaceae).” Butternut Squash (Cucurbita Moschata, Cucurbitaceae), American Botanical Council, Feb. 2015, http://cms.herbalgram.org/heg/volume12/02February/FAMbutternutsquash.html?ts=1571619715&signature=7e58bdee5ccbf68c006f64a8d707b92d.

Penner, Joel. “INDIVIDUAL HERBS.” Rou Dou Kou - 肉豆蔻 - Semen Myristicae - Chinese Herbs - American Dragon - Dr Joel Penner OMD, LAc, https://www.americandragon.com/Individualherbsupdate/RouDouKou.html.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/77981/butternut-squash-soup-ii/

Boone, Rhoda. “Beef Bone Broth.” Epicurious, Epicurious, 31 Dec. 2014, https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/beef-bone-broth-51260700.

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